Bock beer season in Munich: behind the scenes of the “dark dopp

A strong beer, also known as Bock beer, is a top- or bottom-fermentation beer with an original gravity of 16%. The most common kind of Bock beer in Munich is the “dark doppelbock beer”. The name of those beers often ends with “ator”. To use this name the beers must have an original gravity of at least 18%. This percentage of original gravity means – in simple terms – the level of fermentable sugar in 100 ml of Gyle (as the brewer calls the “hopped water-malt mixture” before fermentation). This value is also crucial for the alcohol strength of the beer. The more sugar is fermented by the yeast, the higher the alcohol strength of the beer.

With 18.5% original gravity the Ayinger Celebrator Bock beer is a worthy representative of the dark doppelbock beers. In order to obtain this high original gravity, the ratio of water and malt during mashing is crucial. While normal beers have a ratio of 3:1 the ratio for Bock beers is 2:1.

In order to achieve the almost black, impenetrable color of the Celebrator, dark roasted malt is added to the quantity of malt. This dark roasted malt also tastes a bit like coffee. The alcohol strength of the Celebrator is 6.7%. Therefore the majority of the available sugar in the Gyle is fermented by the yeast. In consequence, there is very little of the sweetness that is frequently to be tasted with doppelbock beer.

Ayinger Celebrator has been classified as one of the world’s best beers by the Chicago Testing Institute for several times and also honored with numerous platinum medals. During the Bock beer season we serve the Ayinger Celebrator beer in the Ayingers Inn in Munich, as well as many other specialties of the Ayinger Brewery, traditionally on tap.

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