Munich’s most famous speciality: Weisswurst

The weisswurst (white sausage) is one of the best known and most traditional dishes of Munich. It is traditionally prepared early in the morning and as is served later that same morning with the first morning pint with sweet mustard, pretzels and weissbier (wheat beer). The recipe for weisswurst is kept strictly under wraps by the city’s butchers. The only detail that is known is that it must consist of at least 51% veal.

picture source: flickr (thomas pix)

The History of the Munich Weisswurst

According to a legend, the weisswurst was created out of necessity in the tavern “Zum Ewigen Licht” on Munich’s Marienplatz on 22 February 1857. The landlord at the time, Josef (Sepp) Moser, wanted to prepare his popular veal sausages for that morning’s late breakfast trade, but found to his horror that he had run out of the tender sheep intestines needed for the recipe.

Because he did not want to keep his hungry guests waiting, he decided that instead of the usual sheep casings, he would have to make do with stuffing firmer pigs’ intestines with the sausage meat. He feared that these sausages would burst if fried, so he first steeped them in hot water and then served them in a tureen. The guests were so excited by the new creation that Moser began making the sausages this way every morning thereafter.

This may well be only a legend, as it’s not quite certain if this is how the sausage’s history really happened. Other sources report that there was already a French recipe in the fourteenth century for pre-boiled sausages.

Eating Weisswurst

There are many ways of removing the meat from the casing — which way is the right way has been argued for centuries. One option is to “doodle” on the weisswurst by taking the sausage in one’s hand and sucking the meat from the casing. Another option would be to eat the sausage with fork and knife where you slice along the length of the sausage and delicately peel away the casing.

By tradition, the weisswurst is offered in most pubs only until noon because it was prepared fresh every morning and there were no refrigeration facilities in the past. This tradition is not so strictly followed nowadays and so you can enjoy weisswurst forbreakfast at the Platzl Hotel and then have them again later in the day at Ayingers Inn  until 5:30 pm.

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