Botanical Garden Munich

Munich offers large recreational spaces with its green areas such as the English Garden, the Isar Meadows and Olympiapark where one can relax and flee from the hectic everyday life.
The Botanical Garden in München-Nymphenburg offers a discovery tour through various tropical wetlands, cool mountain forests and warm deserts which make the trip memorable.

picture source: flickr (bangli1)

With 220.000 m² of area, it is one of the largest botanical gardens in Germany and is home to over 14,000 plant species. Over 400,000 tourists attracted to this tourist destination get an insight into the different ecological requirements of these species and collect ideas for their own gardens each year. The greenhouses of the botanical garden in Munich cover a total area of 4500 m² and offer a lot of space for amazement and exploration.

picture source: flickr (Allie_Caulfield)

Development of the Botanical Garden in Munich

The first botanical garden was developed in 1809 according to the design put forward by Friedrich Ludwig von Sckell. Today, there are still some parts of it remaining near Karlsplatz in the city centre. On the initiative of Karl Ritter von Goebel, the development of the New Botanical Garden in Nymphenburg was planned and realised in 1914.
In the same premises, the Botanical State Collection and the Institute for Systematic Botany of Ludwig-Maximilian-University are located, which are managed as a union since 1966.
Since 1956, the Society of Friends of the Botanical Garden Munich is the related friends’ association. The Botanical Garden belongs to the Bavarian State Collections and is hence not only devoted to the leisure activities of nature lovers but also serves as a basis for research work which are part of the training courses of students studying at Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich and of gardeners.

The exciting journey through rare plant species

One can get many new impressions through a trip to the Botanical Garden. When walking along the paths in the garden, you can discover rare European plant and bee species. A passage leads directly to the Nymphenburger Schlosspark where the museum Mensch und Natur (Human and Nature) is located. At the botanical garden, there are various places of interest such as the Schmuckhof (ornamental courtyard), Rhododendronhain, the Arboretum, Alpinum am See and Alpengarten am Schachen (Alpine Garden at Schachen).

picture source: flickr (Allie_Caulfield)

The opening hours are 09:00-19:00 daily in May, June, July and August and 09:00-18:00 in April and September. A day ticket for adults costs 4€. Daily, various events are held here. In summer, for example, the travelling exhibition ‘ ‘Heavenly Scents and Ungodly Stench ‘’ is open to visitors daily in the Winterhalle (Winter Hall) and Grünen Saal (Green Hall) till 9 September 2012. The entry costs 5€.

And also an enjoyment of special art is provided: In the ‘‘Kulinarischen Gartenführungen“ (culinary garden tours) with lavender, thyme, sage and other aromatic plants, the sense of taste and smell can be tested and extended regularly with selected samples offered to taste.
Every second and fourth Sunday of the month, guided tours with duration of one hour are held. These begin at 10 am. After the tour, one can relax at the terrace of the café belonging to the Botanical Garden and have a cup of coffee and cakes.

Even during winter months, the Botanical Garden is worth visiting since interesting exhibitions are held here in the tropical greenhouses with exotic butterflies among others.

picture source: flickr (digital cat)

 

For further information with regard to the different plant species, event dates and exact directions, visit the official website www.botmuc.de

From Platzl Hotel Munich, you can reach the Botanical Garden by car in 20 minutes or by tram line 17, travelling in direction of Amalienburgstraße up to the stop Botanischer Garten.

 

 

 

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One Response to Botanical Garden Munich

  1. I love the way you wrote this article. This is wonderful. I do hope you intend to write more of these types of articles. Thank you for this interesting content!

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